Précédent
collective authors
Egis
Published on May 25, 2021

Reading time : 2 min

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Camille Come: inside a career in territorial design

After 12 years of experience as a consultant on projects related to the city, Camille became a designer in a specialised agency. Today, he is back serving as a consultant in order to implement innovative solutions in response to current societal and environmental transitions. A look back at his career...

© keisuke-higashio - Unsplash

- Crédits : © keisuke-higashio-Unsplash

Interview with Camille Come, territorial designer and consultant at Conseil by Egis.

After 12 years of experience as a consultant on projects related to the city, Camille became a designer in a specialised agency. Today, he is back in the position of consultant to implement innovative solutions in response to current societal and environmental transitions. A look back at his career...

What is your initial training?

C.C. :I am a geographer and urban planner. I have always been curious about territories, particularly about the way they are the result of political decisions and social actions. During my initial studies, two professors inspired me and still inspire me: Michel Lussault, who was then a young professor at the Geo faculty of Tours, and François Asher, who was an incredible sociologist and futurist at the French Institute of Urbanism.

What did your previous job involve?

C.C. :As a generalist consultant, I assisted local authorities and private operators in making strategic choices. This mainly involved carrying out urban, market, political, financial, technical and communication analyses, etc. For example, I advised the Annemasse agglomeration on the transformation of its station area. I helped the elected representatives to decide on their priorities: real estate projects that need to be developed, developments to be carried out, governance and organisation of the operation, etc. I also had to play the role of integrator of the group's various subsidiaries and synthesise the studies to make them tools for decision-making.

What is territorial design?

C.C. :The key idea of "design thinking": to no longer dissociate the user from the act of producing an object, service, or policy. Territorial design therefore means producing solutions with the territory's users to respond to the societal and environmental transitions underway. For example, it means imagining with a class of fifth graders the use of a child in the city and co-producing the games they dream of with them in the street. Territorial design means leading a co-production workshop with about a dozen of the committed actors (entrepreneurs, associations, cultural players, innovators, residents, users, etc.) by creating a model surrounding them, carpools, as well as mini-buses, to enhance the attractiveness of Vierzon's city centre.

What has motivated your career development?

C.C. :I was a bit fed up with the fact that some studies remain in the cupboards and that the project owners do not fully incorporate them. With the "design" methods, they are in the workshop with the citizens, the entrepreneurs, the inhabitants, etc. They are committed to the project, so they are in fact a part of the process.

Why come back to egis?

C.C. :As a designer, I worked on a wide variety of subjects, not just urban ones: welcoming people with autism in libraries, customer satisfaction for a home services company, the use of digital data within a general council, etc. These subjects were very thought-provoking, but they did not allow me to make the most of my knowledge as an urban planner or the expertise I have acquired over the last 15 years in territorial development. On the other hand, I’m convinced that I can put this new aspect of "design thinking" to good use within the Egis teams. This would allow solutions developed to have a little more of a positive impact, because they will have been genuinely co-produced with the involved actors and will therefore respond effectively and efficiently to any challenges that may arise.

Comments
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
0 comment